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Learning From the Crowd: A Holy Week Reflection on How We Turn Against Jesus

I remember learning as a child in Sunday school about how the Palm Sunday crowd welcomed Jesus into Jerusalem with great enthusiasm and anticipation.  It never really made much sense to me how they could turn on him so much in just a week’s time, but I was too young to strongly question this.  When I got older, I suppose I just stopped thinking about it.  All that mattered is that I had been taught “the gospel,” namely, that even though we are fickle sinners just like the people on Palm Sunday, God sent Jesus to die for our sins on the cross.  Well, I’ve since discovered that “how they could turn on him” really matters, and so I think it’s worth revisiting what “the crowd” during Holy Week teaches us about this gospel claim.

First, that God sent Jesus:

It is crucial to remember that before sending Jesus, God sent others.  There’s a story behind the story.  Most importantly for Jewish memory, God sent Moses, through whom God liberated Israel from slavery and gave to them the Law.  This was their primal narrative.  Life in Egypt was marked by the politics of oppression, much like in Rome.  Pharaoh’s gods were at the head of the religious establishment, which was synonymous with economic affluence.  Like the ancient Israelites, first-century Jews were subjected to the emperor’s reign of domination and awaited one who would “command peace to the nations” (Zech. 9:10).

The Israelites began to forget where they came from, that they were once slaves in Egypt.  They started looking more and more like the Egyptians themselves. After Moses, God also sent the Prophets.  They had to issue a warning.  Liberation from slavery is a good thing – the most original meaning of the word “salvation” – but it can so easily develop into a new form of tribalism and violence.  Their fear and anxiety led them to desire once more the security of Empire.  They wanted their own king and kingdom.  Before long, this also meant they needed their own slaves.  In other words, the formerly oppressed were becoming the oppressors.  Israel was being recreated into the image of Egypt:

[Jerusalem] that was full of justice, righteousness lodged in her – but now murderers! Your princes are rebels and companions of thieves.  Everyone loves as bribe and runs after gifts.  They do not defend the orphan, and the widow’s cause does not come before them. (Isaiah 1:21b, 23)

Jerusalem was “the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it” (Matt. 23:37; Luke 13:34). Making his way to Jerusalem, Jesus knew though that the “chief priests, the elders and the scribes” neither wanted nor understood his sort of peace.  This is why “[a]s Jesus drew near and saw Jerusalem, he wept over it, saying, ‘If you, even you, had only recognized the things that make for peace!  But now they are hidden from your eyes’” (Luke 19:41).  Unlike Pilate’s triumphal entry on the west side of town, Jesus processes on a donkey, with no army behind him, and no news of conquest.  While they’re not sure what to make of this, the people still chant, “Hosanna!” Maybe he really could be their deliverer…

Second, To die for our sin:

During Holy Week, we see in Jerusalem the same social system that was condemned by the prophets, the same one that Jesus confronted, and the same one that killed him.  Like the prophets before him, Jesus was engaged in the dangerous business of challenging the Jewish high-priestly collaboration with imperial control.  His teachings about the Kingdom of God were perceived as, and in a real sense were, a threat to the political and religious establishment.  The day after Jesus’s arrival, he harshly and publically criticizes the temple and its complicity with the system of Roman exploitation in yet another street theater-styled demonstration – by driving out the buyers and sellers.  This was an extraordinarily adversarial act.

Palm Sunday signals the beginning of the recurring journey of God’s people from Exodus to Exile – in one week.  In first-century Jerusalem, the jobs of the high priest Caiaphas and Pontius Pilate were tricky and difficult.  They had to both please Rome and quell the frustration of the Jewish people so as to prevent civil unrest at the same time.  Was this the same crowd as before?  Some scholars doubt it, but this wouldn’t change the lesson. The crowds did not really understand who Jesus was.  They had seen him perform signs and wonders, but his teachings were scandalous.  Just like the Israelites wandering in the desert, they were still scared because of their insecure material circumstances and easily swayed by the influence of their society’s scheming leaders.

When we figure out that Jesus is not going to give us what we want, and not in the way that we want it, whether we’re in a position like Pilate or the crowd, we easily turn against him. This “turning against” is the opposite of belief and repentance.  It’s that tendency in all of us to let the ego take over, to be driven by fear, shame, and anger, and to close off our hearts.  It is because of (“for”) the crowd’s sin of “turning against” him that Jesus dies.

Finally, on the cross:

Caesar, called “a son of the gods,” and “lord,” brings peace through conquest and the cross.  Jesus, the Son of God, and Lord, brings peace by bankrupting conquest and the cross.  Walter Brueggemann says this about the cross in The Prophetic Imagination:

The cross is the ultimate metaphor of prophetic criticism because it means the end of the old consciousness that brings death on everyone.  The crucifixion articulates God’s odd freedom, his strange justice, and his peculiar power.  It is this freedom (read religion of God’s freedom), justice (read economics of sharing), and power (read politics of justice), which break the power of the old age and bring it to death. (p. 99)

Thus, the twofold theme of Holy week is this: radical discipleship in an unjust world means following Jesus 1) to a place of non-violent confrontation with the powers of domination and exploitation, and 2) on a path toward personal transformation through death to self (“deny themselves . . . and follow me.” – Mark 8:34).  For “death to self” is basically open-heartedness that extends forgiveness even to enemies, just as Jesus extends it to the rulers and fickle crowd that shouts, “Crucify him!”  In truth, we are all like the rulers and the fickle crowd.

In our post-Christian culture especially, but in any culture, the appropriate response to Jesus’s week in Jerusalem is not a proud victory cry that rushes to Easter morning for relief from a guilty-conscience and the fear of punishment.  Nor is it for bold propositional assertion about the “truth of our belief.” But this is what we’ve frequently made it.  Instead, for Holy Week, the charge to churches is bold embodiment of and deep trust in Jesus’s alternative practice of peace – not Caesar’s – one that is both humble and subversive, that liberates us from anxiety about worldly security and false narratives of certainty and instant gratification.

Only then will we be close to loving our neighbor.

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